Culture Commentary: A Day Without Woman

#ADWAW is a point of privilege. I feel its necessary to go ahead and plop that out right up front.

While its intentions are good and wholesome and very kumbaya, it is a point of privilege nonetheless. The woman. The woman who already works more only to be paid less, who uses sick days and vacation days to care of all but themselves. The woman who works … with NO paid time off. The woman who cannot afford to take a day off but is now forced to do so because schools are closed.

I salute each woman who has the mind to participate in #ADWAW. But I remain puzzled about its benefits; its beneficiaries. What good does our absence do when, tomorrow, we will have to work even harder to make up for today?

Absence, like quitting, is easy. The real work of the movement is in presence. The real work is in inviting women into your space who do not look like you, who do not worship like you, who do not live like you do and certainly not where you do. It is our presence that builds, that grows, that lifts. We are beyond the point of ABSENCE.

Resistance cannot only be about what we’re “not gonna do”. Resistance is and always has been about breaking barriers. INSISTING that your child’s school celebrates women’s history; INSISTING that Black history is everyone’s history; INSISTING that a girl’s/woman’s body is her own to control; INSISTING absolutely and on every available platform that Black Lives Matter; INSISTING that your coworker not be unfairly treated simply because her skin has been forever kissed by the sun.

Now is the time to be PRESENT

Now is the time to STAND

Now is the time to SPEAK

Now is the time to FIGHT

Now is the time to ACT

It is wonderful to have a national platform to showcase “solidarity” but the truth, for many/most of you is that the real platform – the place where the real work needs to be done, is WITHIN.

Copyright © 2017 Tamika Brown and TheFynePrynt.com

 

Advertisements

July 16, 2013

20140215-224753.jpg

The Verdict has been read. We’ve been angry. We’ve been sad. We’ve been inundated with images of “post-racial” America that really aren’t so pleasing to the eye or the spirit.

And perhaps more importantly we’ve been left with the question of “What Now?” And to this question, provided numerous answers – but the most viable of all those recommendations is to Start Where You Are and Use What You Have.

READ: find at least five different credible/reliable news sources and subscribe to/follow them. Being informed across issues and platforms is critical.

VOLUNTEER: find a local organization that provides services to an issue that is important to you and give some of your time.

MENTOR: share your life, skills and awesomeness with a child who could use a great influence.

VOTE: the past several months have shown us the power of the vote. And with the latest changes to the Voting Rights Act, now more than ever our voice at the polls matters.

SHOW UP: if you’re summoned … get there!

GIVE: if you prefer a more hands-off approach, there is always an organization willing to accept financial gifts to support your cause. But if you’re a first time giver be sure to do a bit of research and vet your chosen agency/ies well.

NONE of these things will bring back Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant, Jordan Davis or the countless others. But perhaps if each one of us takes some action now – it can prevent the next one…

To each of us, His Strength, Peace & Blessings

*I wrote this just a few days after Trayvon Martin’s murderer was found “not guilty”. And so tonight, just hours after the verdict in the murder of Jordan Davis – sadly, here I am again. Heavy hearted, as though he we were my own …. Tomorrow would have been Jordan’s 19th birthday.

Copyright © 2013, 2014 Tamika Brown and TheFynePrynt.com

Photo: @thafyneprynt

This skin requires Courage, Hope, Love.

20140107-151333.jpg

Isn’t it always so amazing the things we experience each day, each moment? Today would have been the 123rd birthday of acclaimed author Zora Neale Hurston and of all her wonderful words, I was struck most by this quote from How It Feels To Be Colored Me:

“Sometimes, I feel discriminated against, but it does not make me angry. It merely astonishes me. How can any deny themselves the pleasure of my company? It’s beyond me.”

With all the talk of our “post-racial” society the tragedy is truly that too many things are happening to individuals daily based on nothing more than the color of their skin – both “positive” and negative. It is certainly true that not EVERY thing is racial but it is also true that the things that are racial should not be overlooked.

For instance their is jubilant news that SNL has hired it’s first African American female comedienne in 7 years. That’s great but in a post racial society should/would it be news? Is the ascension into one’s passions and attaining one’s dreams so rare for People of Color (POC) and specifically Women of Color (WOC)? Is it generally seen as a supernatural event for POC/WOC to reach this level?

I don’t have the answers and I’ll leave it here for now but in the meantime I salute every person who has the Courage, Hope and Love to truly live in their own skin!

Learn More. Love More.